A new, additional approach

Could the depopulation of Europe’s more remote countryside, the wildlife comeback, the increasing demand for wildlife and wilderness and a more favourable policy in Europe maybe provide new opportunities if we connect them with each other?

Apennine chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica ornata) females and kids/juveniles in summer at rest on rocky slope. Endemic to the Apennine mountains. Abruzzo, Italy.

Apennine chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica ornata) females and kids/juveniles in summer at rest on rocky slope. Endemic to the Apennine mountains. Abruzzo, Italy.
Bruno D'Amicis/Rewilding Europe

 

Could that combination in its turn maybe also provide some new solutions for the people who would prefer to stay on the land?   And at the same time provide a solution for biodiversity? Could some of those areas that are now abandoned by farming use, be returned into naturally functioning areas? Could such areas ideally have all the important species and processes once again shaping the vegetation and the landscapes? Could more wild nature and more wildlife help lay the foundation for a socially and economically more sustainable rural society in certain regions? Could it mean more business, jobs and income there? Could this also provide more cost-effective forms of management of Nature 2000 sites – in particular the larger and more natural ones? And, could this maybe even help counter some of the impacts of climate change?

Rewilding Europe believes that the combination of these trends provides a historic opportunity for both nature and people in Europe. We believe there is a way for a new and additional approach to nature conservation, where the concept of wild nature and natural processes is accepted as one of the main management principles.

We call that way rewilding. Rewlding of areas, habitats, species and minds.